COVID-19 ALERT: Find COVID-19 Testing Sites. COVID-19 Vaccine Info. New Visitor Policy. Make a Donation.

Toggle Menu

Welcome to the NYC Test & Trace Corps resource page. We are here to help you! Whether you received a text from us about your recent COVID-19 test or you’re seeking information about exposures, testing, quarantining or anything else related to COVID-19, you’re in the right place.

As of June 27th, deliveries through the GetFood and Take Care program have ended.

For the Emergency Food Assistance Program (EFAB), please call 311 or visit https://access.nyc.gov/programs/emergency-food-assistance/ to learn more about enrolling and/or where to find local food pantries.

For assistance with COVID-19 treatments, vaccination appointments, and resources for Long COVID (Aftercare), please call 212-COVID-19 (212-268-4319).

Resource Navigation: What We Can Help You With

English | Español | Shqip | االعربية | বাংলা | Français | Kreyòl Ayisyen | हिंदी | 한국어 | Polski | Русский | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | اُردُو

Resource Guide

English | Español | Shqip | االعربية | বাংলা | Français | Kreyòl Ayisyen | हिंदी | 한국어 | Polski | Русский | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | اُردُو

COVID-19 Resources

If you’ve been exposed to COVID-19, the NYC Test & Trace Corps is here to support you. To find out what to do next, you can:

Exposure to COVID-19

Being exposed to COVID-19 means you were in close contact with a person who has COVID-19 and you may need to quarantine.

Close contact is defined as being within 6 feet of someone with COVID-19 for a total of at least 15 minutes within a 24-hour period (for example, 3 separate 5-minute exposures on the same day) starting 2 days before their symptoms started or, if they don’t have symptoms, before they were tested. This applies even if you are vaccinated or were wearing a mask.

If you live in the same household with a person who has COVID-19 you are considered a close contact until they start isolating.

Guidance for people exposed to COVID-19 depends on their vaccination status and history of COVID-19 infection.

For more information, see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines page.

Quarantine guidance

The guidance in this section applies to anyone who has been exposed to COVID-19 and falls into one of these four categories:

  • You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND do not have any COVID-19 symptoms
  • You are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND have COVID-19 symptoms
  • You are not up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and do not have any COVID-19 symptoms
  • You are not up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and have COVID-19 symptoms

COVID-19 symptoms include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, congestion or runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of taste or smell.
vacc
Please scroll down to find the category that applies to you.

Up to date with COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND do not have any COVID-19 symptoms

If you are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND you do not have any COVID-19 symptoms, you do not need to quarantine as long as you continue to not have any COVID-19 symptoms, but should follow the below guidance.

  • For 10 full days after the day you were exposed (day 0), you should:
    • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
    • Monitor yourself closely for symptoms
  • If possible, get tested 5 days after your last exposure
    • If you were exposed on more than one day, get tested 5 days after the date of your initial exposure and again on 5 days after your most recent exposure
    • If you had COVID within the last 90 days, you should only get tested if you develop symptoms

If you develop symptoms, please see “Up to date with COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND have COVID-19 symptoms,” below, or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool for personalized guidance.

Household contacts
If the person you were exposed to is a household member and you are not able to separate from them, your last day of exposure is the last day you were (or will be) exposed to them during their isolation period.

Further information and resources

Up to date with COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND have COVID-19 symptoms

If you are up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines OR had COVID-19 in the last 90 days AND you have COVID-19 symptoms, please follow the guidance below.

  • Get tested and stay inside your home and away from other people (isolate) while awaiting your test result
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
  • Monitor your symptoms closely. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing, chest pain or new confusion), seek emergency medical care immediately.
  • Reach out to a health care provider
  • If your test result is positive or you are unable to get tested, isolate for at least for at least 5 days from symptom onset (day 0) and follow the isolation guidance in the What to do if you test positive for COVID-19 section or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool
  • If your test result is negative:
    • If you took the test with a health care provider or at a testing site, you can stop isolating
    • If you used an at-home test, you should continue to isolate and take a second test at least 24 hours later. If that test is negative, you can stop isolating.
    • Continue to monitor your symptoms and wear a well-fitting mask around others, including at home, and take additional precautions until day 10

Household contacts
If the person you were exposed to is a household member and you are not able to separate from them, your last day of exposure is the last day you were (or will be) exposed to them during their isolation period.

Returning to work or school
This guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school after an exposure may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

Not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and do not have COVID-19 symptoms

If you are not up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and you do not have any COVID-19 symptoms, please follow the guidance below.

  • Stay inside your home and away from other people (quarantine) for 5 full days after your last exposure (day 0)
  • For 10 full days after your last exposure, you should:
    • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
    • Monitor yourself closely for symptoms
  • If possible, get tested 5 days after your last exposure
  • You can stop quarantining on day 6 as long as you have been symptom-free throughout the 5-day period
  • If you are moderately to severely immunocompromised or unable to wear a mask for 5 full days (this includes children under age 2, who are not recommended to wear masks), quarantine for 10 full days

If you develop symptoms, please see “Not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and have COVID-19 symptoms,” below, or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool for personalized guidance.

Household contacts
If the person you were exposed to is a household member and you are not able to separate from them, your last day of exposure is the last day you were [or will be] exposed to them during their isolation period.

Returning to work or school
This guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school after an exposure may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

Not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and have COVID-19 symptoms

If you are not up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines and you have COVID-19 symptoms, please follow the guidance below.

  • Get tested and stay inside your home and away from other people (isolate) while awaiting your test result
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
  • Monitor your symptoms closely. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing, chest pain or new confusion), seek emergency medical care immediately.
  • Reach out to a health care provider
  • If your test result is positive or you are unable to get tested, isolate for at least 5 days from symptom onset and follow the isolation guidance in the What to do if you test positive for COVID-19 section or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool
  • If your test result is negative:
    • If you took the test with a health care provider or at a testing site, quarantine for at least 5 days from your last exposure
    • If you took an at-home test, you should continue to isolate and take a second test at least 24 hours later. If that test is negative, quarantine for at least 5 days from your last exposure.
    • If you are moderately to severely immunocompromised or unable to wear a mask for 5 full days (this includes children under age 2, who are not recommended to wear masks), quarantine for at least 10 days from your last exposure
    • Continue to monitor your symptoms and wear a well-fitting mask around others, including at home, for 10 days from your last exposure

Household contacts
If the person you were exposed to is a household member and you are not able to separate from them, your last day of exposure is the last day you were (or will be) exposed to them during their isolation period.

Returning to work or school
This guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work or school after an exposure may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

Whether you received a positive COVID-19 test result from a provider, testing site or at-home test, you are in the right place. To find out what to do next, you can:

  • Find the isolation guidance below that applies to you
  • Try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool for personalized guidance, including when you can end isolation based on the date you tested positive and whether you have symptoms

Isolation guidance

The guidance in this section applies to anyone who has tested positive for COVID-19, regardless of vaccination status, and falls into one of these two categories:

  • You tested positive for COVID-19 and do not have any COVID-19 symptoms
  • You tested positive for COVID-19 and have COVID-19 symptoms

Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, congestion or runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of taste or smell.

Please scroll down to find the category that applies to you.

Tested positive and do not have COVID-19 symptoms

If you tested positive for COVID-19 and do not have any COVID-19 symptoms, please follow the guidance below.

Isolating

  • Stay inside your home and safely separate from other people (isolate) for at least 5 days from the day you took your test (day 0)
  • If you are moderately to severely immunocompromised or unable to wear a mask (this includes children under age 2, who are not recommended to wear masks), isolate for at least 10 days from the day you took your test (day 0)
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
  • Monitor yourself closely for symptoms until day 10
  • If you develop symptoms, restart isolation for at least 5 full days after your symptoms began (day 0 is now the day your symptoms began) and return to this page and select “I tested positive for COVID-19 and have COVID-19 symptoms” or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool for personalized guidance

Notifying close contacts

Ending isolation

  • You can stop isolating on day 6 if you have not developed symptoms and are able to wear a well-fitting mask around others through day 10
  • If you stop isolating on day 6, you should take the following precautions from day 6 to day 10:
    • Wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public. Wearing a well-fitting mask following isolation decreases the small risk of transmitting the virus to others.
    • Avoid crowds and nonessential activities
    • Do not go anywhere a mask cannot always be worn, such as restaurants, and avoid eating around others at home and at work
    • Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, as well as nursing homes and other high-risk settings
  • Although a negative test is not needed to end isolation, if you have access to a test and want to test, the best approach is to use an antigen test toward the end of the 5-day isolation period
  • Avoid travel until after day 10 or, if you develop symptoms, for 10 full days after symptom onset

Returning to work or school
This isolation guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school after testing positive may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Isolation resources
You may receive a text from NYC Test & Trace to connect you with personalized isolation guidance and resources to support you, such as medical treatment and food assistance. Texts will come from 844-641-1568.

Further information and other resources

Tested positive and have COVID-19 symptoms

If you tested positive for COVID-19 and have COVID-19 symptoms, please follow the guidance below.

Isolating

  • Stay inside your home and safely separate from other people (isolate) for at least 5 full days after your symptoms began (day 0)
  • If you are moderately to severely immunocompromised or unable to wear a mask (this includes children under age 2, who are not recommended to wear masks), isolate for 10 full days after your symptoms began (day 0)

Health and safety

  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
  • Monitor your symptoms closely. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing, chest pain, confusion), seek emergency medical care immediately.
  • There are treatment options that can help higher-risk people feel better sooner and prevent hospitalization. These treatments work best when given as early as possible. Reach out to a health care provider, see the Medical Care and Treatment section or call at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 9.

Notifying close contacts

Ending isolation

  • If you do not feel better or you still have a fever after 5 days of isolation, speak with a health care provider and continue to isolate until your symptoms are resolving and you have been fever-free without the use of medication for 24 hours
  • If you feel better after 5 days — meaning you do not have symptoms or your symptoms are resolving and you have been fever-free without the use of medication for 24 hours — you can stop isolating on day 6 if you are able to wear a well-fitting mask around others for 5 additional days (from day 6 to day 10)
  • If you stop isolating on day 6, you should take the following precautions from days 6 to 10:
    • Wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public. Wearing a well-fitting mask following isolation decreases the small risk of transmitting the virus to others.
    • Avoid crowds and nonessential activities
    • Do not go anywhere a mask cannot always be worn, such as restaurants, and avoid eating around others at home and at work
    • Avoid people who are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, as well as nursing homes and other high-risk settings
  • Although a negative test is not needed to end isolation, if you have access to a test and want to test, the best approach is to use an antigen test toward the end of the 5-day isolation period
  • Avoid travel until after at least 10 full days after symptom onset

Returning to work or school
This isolation guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school after testing positive may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Isolation resources
You may receive a text from NYC Test & Trace to connect you with personalized isolation guidance and resources to support you, such as medical treatment and food assistance. Texts will come from 844-641-1568.

Further information and other resources

If you have COVID-19 symptoms but don’t know if you were exposed and don’t have a positive test result, the NYC Test & Trace Corps can help you figure out what next steps you should take.

Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, congestion or runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and loss of taste or smell.

Isolation guidance

This section contains isolation guidance for anyone who falls into one of these three categories:

  • You have COVID-19 symptoms and have not taken a test
  • You have COVID-19 symptoms and are awaiting your test results
  • You have COVID-19 symptoms and have tested negative for COVID-19

Please scroll down to find the guidance that applies to you.

Have COVID-19 symptoms and have not taken a COVID-19 test

If you have COVID-19 symptoms but have not taken a COVID-19 test since your symptoms began, please follow the guidance below.

  • Get tested and stay inside your home and away from other people (isolate) while awaiting your test result
  • If you are not able to get tested or don’t plan to get tested:
    • Stay inside your home and safely separate from other people (isolate) for at least 5 days from when your symptoms began (day 0)
    • If you do not feel better or you still have a fever after 5 days of isolation, speak with your health care provider and continue to isolate until your symptoms are resolving and you have been fever-free without the use of medication for 24 hours
    • If you are moderately to severely immunocompromised or unable to wear a mask for 5 full days (this includes children under age 2, who are not recommended to wear masks), isolate for at least 10 full days
    • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
    • Monitor your symptoms closely. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing, chest pain or new confusion), seek emergency medical care immediately.
    • If you have questions or concerns about your symptoms, reach out to a health care provider

Returning to work or school
This isolation guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

Have COVID-19 symptoms and are awaiting test result

If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and are still awaiting your test result, please follow the guidance below.

  • While awaiting your test results, you should:
    • Stay inside your home and safely separate from other people (isolate)
    • Wear a well-fitting mask when you are not able to separate from others, including at home
    • Monitor your symptoms closely. If you have an emergency warning sign (including trouble breathing, chest pain or new confusion), seek emergency medical care immediately.
  • If your test result is positive, continue isolating and follow the isolation guidance in the What to do if you test positive for COVID-19 section or try out our COVID-19 Quarantine and Isolation Guidance Tool
  • If your test result is negative:
    • If you took the test with a health care provider or at a testing site, you can stop isolating
    • If you used an at-home test, you should continue to isolate and take a second test at least 24 hours later. If that test is negative, you can stop isolating.
  • If you have questions or concerns about your symptoms, reach out to a health care provider

Returning to work or school
This isolation guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school after testing positive may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

Have COVID-19 symptoms and tested negative

If you have COVID-19 symptoms and received a negative result on the COVID-19 test you took after your symptoms began, please follow the guidance below.

  • If you took your test with a health care provider or at a testing site, you don’t have to isolate
  • If you used an at-home test, you should isolate and take a second test at least 24 hours later. If that test is negative, you can stop isolating.
  • If you have questions or concerns about your symptoms, reach out to a health care provider. If you do not have a health care provider, you can call 311 or NYC Health + Hospitals at 844-NYC-4NYC (844-692-4692) for help finding one. You can also schedule a virtual visit with an NYC Health + Hospitals provider by visiting ExpressCare and clicking on “Talk to a Doctor Now.”

Returning to work or school
This isolation guidance pertains to your day-to-day activities at home and in the community. The rules regarding returning to work and school may vary by individual employer and school setting.

Further information and resources

If you have or were exposed to COVID-19, you can protect your loved ones and other members of your household by following these tips to helo you separate safely (quarantine or isolate) at home.

  • Stay home and do not leave except to get essential medical care or purchase basic necessities such as groceries or prescriptions if you are unable to have them delivered and someone cannot get them for you
  • Stay away from others, avoiding contact with other members of the household and pets
  • Stay in a separate room from other household members if possible
  • Wear a well-fitting mask when you have to be in the same room as others and keep at least 6 feet of distance whenever possible. Consider wearing two masks or a higher-grade mask, such as a KN95 or KF94, which offer more protection than other disposable or cloth masks. Using a cloth mask over a disposable mask improves the fit and adds layers.
  • Use a separate bathroom if possible
  • Don’t share personal household items, like cups, towels and utensils
  • Take steps to improve ventilation in your home. For example, open windows or doors to bring fresh air inside. For more tips, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Improving Ventilation in Your Home page.
  • For additional tips, see the NYC Test & Trace Corps’ How to Separate Safely at Home pamphlet
  • If you need assistance to help you separate safely at home, see “Resources to help you separate safely,” below

Food assistance

Emergency food delivery

The NYC Test & Trace Corps’ Take Care program provides free meal delivery so you can remain at home. For information, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-540-6923.

Soup kitchens and food banks

For information on other food assistance resources, including soup kitchens and food banks, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language, press 5 and then select option 1.

Emergency food assistance

Everyone is eligible for emergency food assistance, regardless of immigration status or how much money you have. Visit the NYC Human Resources Administration’s Emergency Food Assistance Program page for information on the various options available.

Additional Resources

If you need other resources to help you safely separate from others, such as mental health support or domestic violence services, the NYC Test & Trace Corps can help. Just call our hotline at 212-540-6923. Resource navigators are available to assist you Monday to Thursday, 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Friday, Saturday, Sunday and holidays, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Outside these hours, you can leave a voicemail and someone will call you back.

Take Care Hotels

The Take Care isolation hotel program ended in April 2022. If you or someone you know tested positive for COVID-19 and needs support in your isolation, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-540-6923 to connect directly with a resource navigator. Resource navigators are available Monday to Thursday, 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. and Friday to Sunday and holidays, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. You are also able to leave a voicemail and a resource navigator will return your call.

Find a testing site

Getting tested for COVID-19 is as important as ever, and New York City has many sites offering COVID-19 testing at no cost to you. To get tested, use any of these options:

  • Visit the NYC Health + Hospitals COVID-19 Testing Sites page to find no-cost testing in every borough (including up-to-the-minute locations for mobile sites)
  • Find a no-cost testing site based on your location using the NYC Health Department COVID-19 Testing Locations page
  • Text COVID TEST to 855-48 to find a no-cost testing site near you
  • Make an appointment for a no-cost rapid test at an NYC Health Department COVID Express site
  • Call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319) and press 1 after selecting your language
  • Speak with your health care provider
  • If you do not have a health care provider, you can call NYC Health + Hospitals at 844-NYC-4NYC (844-692-4692) or 311 for help finding one. You can also schedule a virtual visit with an NYC Health + Hospitals provider by visiting ExpressCare and clicking on “Talk to a Doctor Now,” or by calling the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319) and pressing 2 after selecting your language.

At-home testing

Test first, NYC!

  • If you’re planning to meet up with friends or family, the best way to protect them is to test first
  • In addition to getting tested when you have a known exposure, regular testing before and after travel and attending gatherings is crucial to stopping COVID in its tracks
  • You can do your part by adding regular testing to the list of actions you take — like masking in indoor public settings and when you’re with folks at high risk of severe disease — to protect yourself and those around you from COVID-19

Vaccination
The COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, free and widely available, regardless of your immigration status.

New Yorkers ages 5 and older are urged to stay up to date with their vaccines. Up to date means you have received all recommended COVID-19 vaccines, including booster doses when eligible. For more information, see “Boosters” below.

Getting vaccinated and boosted in NYC is easy, fast and free. And you are entitled by law to take leave time to do it — and to get your children vaccinated, as well! Below you will find all of the information you need.

Boosters
Vaccine booster shots can boost your immunity after an initial vaccination series. The COVID-19 vaccines are still very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death due to COVID-19. However, there is growing evidence that protection against mild to moderate infection is not as strong, and that protection may decrease over time.

A booster shot can provide extra protection to you, your family and your community by reducing your chance of getting COVID-19 and spreading it to others, including children too young to be vaccinated and friends and family who are at increased risk of severe illness. Booster shots are especially important given the presence of more contagious variants of the virus.

For more information on staying up to date with your vaccines, please see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Stay Up to Date with Your Vaccines page.

Exposure Notifications

Did you know you could use your phone to find out if you’ve been exposed to COVID-19? Download the COVID Alert NY app on any smartphone or turn on Exposure Notifications in your iPhone settings and you’ll be alerted if you’ve spent time near someone who has COVID-19. It’s completely anonymous — your name, phone number and location are not tracked.

  • For all smartphones, visit your app store and download COVID Alert NY
  • For iPhones, go to Settings > Notifications > Turn on Exposure Notifications

Mask up, NYC!

Face masks are an important tool to prevent COVID-19. Wearing a well-fitting face mask helps protect you from infection and also protects those around you in case you are infected but do not know it. Consider wearing a mask in public indoor settings where vaccine status is not known.

While masking is no longer required in indoor venues in NYC, it may still be required in: mass transit, health care facilities, correctional facilities, homeless shelters and individual businesses. Additionally, individual businesses are allowed to choose whether they will mandate masks or vaccination for clients upon entry.

New Yorkers should consider wearing masks at private gatherings and in some cases at home, especially around those who are unvaccinated, immunocompromised and/or at increased risk of developing severe illness from COVID-19.

If you are in one of these high-risk groups or are at increased risk of exposure due to your job or some other factor, you should consider wearing two masks or a higher-grade mask, such as a KN95 or KF94, as they offer more protection than other disposable or cloth masks. Using a cloth mask over a disposable mask improves the fit and adds layers. People who are at high risk of severe illness, who are over 65, or are unvaccinated will benefit most from this added layer of protection.

For important information on effective mask-wearing, please see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Improve How Your Mask Protects You page.

Further Information

For more tips on COVID-19 prevention, see the NYC Health Department COVID-19: Prevention and Groups at Higher Risk page.

For current public health guidance related to COVID-19 prevention, visit the NYC Health Department’s COVID-19 page or call 311.

People with COVID-19 have reported a wide range of symptoms, including:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • Sinus (or nasal) congestion or runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Vomiting or nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of taste or smell

You can find more details on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Symptoms of COVID-19 page.

If you are unsure whether you should seek medical care for your symptoms, you can use the CDC’s Coronavirus Self-Checker screening tool.

If you have any serious concerns about your symptoms, we recommend that you speak with your doctor immediately. If you do not have a doctor or cannot reach your doctor, you can reach a medical provider by calling the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319) and pressing 2 after selecting your language.

Be on the lookout for emergency warning signs. These include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Pale, gray or blue-colored skin, lips or nail beds, depending on skin tone

If you experience any of these signs, seek emergency medical attention immediately by calling 911 or going to your nearest emergency room.

Finding medical care for COVID-19

  • For medical questions about COVID-19, we recommend speaking to your health care provider
  • If you do not have a health care provider, you can call 311 or NYC Health + Hospitals at 844-NYC-4NYC (844-692-4692) for help finding one. You can also schedule a virtual visit with an NYC Health + Hospitals provider by visiting ExpressCare and clicking on “Talk to a Doctor Now.”
  • COVID-19-related medical care is also available at NYC Health + Hospitals COVID-19 Centers of Excellence in the Tremont section of the Bronx and Jackson Heights, Queens. Both centers provide short- and long-term care for those recovering from COVID-19, with 24-hour access to a health care provider available. For appointments, call 844-NYC-4NYC (844-692-4692).
  • For assistance over the phone with COVID-19-related medical questions or needs, you can speak with an NYC Health + Hospitals clinician by calling the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), selecting your language and pressing 2
  • If you had COVID-19 and are experiencing new, returning or ongoing symptoms 30 days after your COVID infection, you may have Long COVID. NYC Test & Trace Corps’ AfterCare program supports New Yorkers with Long COVID in their recovery. For information, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 4, or visit the AfterCare webpage.
  • For assistance obtaining health insurance, text “CoveredNYC” to 877877 or call 311

COVID-19 treatment

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you may be eligible to receive treatment to help reduce COVID-19 symptoms and avoid hospitalization. Treatment usually works best if you begin it as soon as you start to feel sick, so get tested right away.

There are two outpatient treatments for mild to moderate COVID-19: monoclonal antibody treatment and oral antiviral pills. You may be eligible for these treatments if you are age 12 or older, have tested positive, and are at an elevated risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Monoclonal antibody treatment

Monoclonal antibodies provide you with antibody protection while your body works to produce its own antibodies. For those at the highest risk for severe illness from COVID-19, this treatment is safe and effective at preventing hospitalization.

Monoclonal antibody treatment is free through NYC Health + Hospitals, even if you do not have health insurance. To find out if you are eligible, visit their COVID-19 Treatment page or call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 9. A full list of providers in NYC offering this treatment can be found on the Hite Site’s Locate Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19 page.

Oral antiviral pills

Oral antiviral pills help stop viruses from replicating, which reduces the amount of virus in your body. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized two antiviral pills to treat COVID-19: Paxlovid and molnupiravir.

To find out if you are eligible to receive oral antiviral pills for COVID-19, reach out to your health care provider or call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 9. If you would like assistance finding a health care provider, please see “Finding medical care for COVID-19,” above.

Further Information

For more information about treatment options for COVID-19, visit the NYC Health Department COVID-19: What to Do When Sick page or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Treatments Your Healthcare Provider Might Recommend if You Are Sick.

If you had COVID-19 and are experiencing new, returning or ongoing symptoms 30 days after your COVID infection, you may have Long COVID. NYC Test & Trace Corps’ AfterCare program supports New Yorkers with Long COVID in their recovery. For information, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 4, or visit the AfterCare webpage.

New Yorkers who have COVID-19 or were in close contact with someone with COVID-19 are eligible for paid sick leave regardless of their immigration status. State and local laws have also established the right to paid leave for workers to take time off to get vaccinated and to care for themselves or a family member.

For more details on who and what is covered by the various State and City paid leave laws, check out the NYC Test & Trace Corps COVID-19 and Paid Sick Leave fact sheet.

If you need a document for your employer confirming that you had to separate from others due to being exposed to or having or COVID-19, please see Quarantine/Isolation Letter for Employer.

For questions about any type of paid leave related to COVID-19, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 6.

If you need a document for your employer confirming that you had to separate from others due to having or being exposed to COVID-19, visit New York State’s Approach to Isolation and Quarantine page and locate “Isolation and Quarantine Affirmation Forms” in the left-hand menu.

For questions or assistance filling out your affirmation form, call the NYC Test & Trace Corps Hotline at 212-COVID19 (212-268-4319), select your language and press 6.

For information about what types of paid leave you may be entitled to, please see COVID-Related Employment Leave.

For essential benefits such as SNAP (food stamps), cash assistance, emergency rental assistance or utility payments, call ACCESS HRA at 718-557-1399 or visit the ACCESS HRA webpage.

Discrimination and harassment

If you have experienced harassment or discrimination related to COVID-19, you can file a report with the NYC Commission on Human Rights COVID-19 Response Team by calling 212-416-0197.

Eviction prevention

For legal services related to eviction or other housing or tenant matters, call the Legal Aid Society at 212-577-3300 or Legal Services NYC at 917-661-4500.

Public charge rule

If you are concerned that services you have been referred to may fall under the public charge rule, please be assured that as of March 2021 this rule is no longer in effect. For more information, call ActionNYC at 800-354-0365 and say “public charge.”

Other legal matters

For assistance with non-criminal legal matters including family law, domestic violence and debt collection, New Yorkers with limited income can contact the City Bar Justice Center Legal Hotline at 212-626-7383.

For assistance from New York Relay, which provides services that enable those with hearing or speech impairments to make and receive phone calls, call 800-662-1220 for English or 877-662-4886 for Spanish.

NYC Test & Trace Corps is a public health initiative created to fight the threat of COVID-19. We are a group of doctors, public health professionals and community advocates working to reverse the COVID-19 outbreak and protect our city.

To provide feedback on the program, please call our feedback line at 646-614-3025.

WE ALWAYS PUT PATIENTS FIRST